The Lean Startup Method

If you haven’t read The Lean Startup by author Eric Ries, I highly suggest you pickup a copy or download a copy for your eReader.

Fascinating passages as Eric describes the five principles of the Lean Startup Method:

1. Entrepreneurs are everywhere.  You don’t have to work in a garage to be in a startup.  The concept of entrepreneurship includes anyone who works within my definition of a startup: a human institution designed to create new products and services under conditions of extreme uncertainty.  That means entrepreneurs are everywhere and the Lean Startup approach can work in any size company, even a very large enterprise, in any sector or industry.

2. Entrepreneurship is management.  A startup is an institution, not just a product, and so it requires a new kind of management specifically geared to its context of extreme uncertainty.  In fact, as I will argue later, I believe “entrepreneur” should be considered a job title in all modern companies that depend on innovation for their future growth.

3. Validated learning.  Startups exist not just to make stuff, make money, or even serve customers.  They exist to learn how to build a sustainable business.  This learning can be validated scientifically by running frequent experiments that allow entrepreneurs to test each element of their vision.

4. Build-Measure-Learn.  The fundamental activity of a startup is to turn ideas into products, measure how customers respond, and then learn whether to pivot or persevere.  All successful startp processes should be geared to accelerate

that feedback loop.

5. Innovation accounting.  To improve entrepreneurial outcomes and hold innovators accountable, we need to focus on the boring stuff: how to measure progress, how to set up milestones, and how to prioritize work.  This reqires a new kind of accounting  designed for startups – and the people who hold them accountable.

What grabs your attention the most from the excerpt above?